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and unless we wake up and really make a drastic change in our foreign policy america will pay a heavy price down the road. melissa: yeah, dramatic conclusion. thank you so much for coming on. i hope you come back. >> thank you. have a great day. melissa: what's in a name? well apparently $35,000 and counting. one man raking it in for auctioning off his name for an entire year. he is here to explain his brilliant scheme. i love it! it is coming u next. at the end of the day it is all about mney and your name apparently [ male announcer ] this is the age of knowing what you're made of. why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cae an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hea
. and she said, no way. i said right. we spent a lot of time on all the traditional foreign-policy issues. we are focused on being domestic and what we want to do is report on education. we don't want a piece on everyone else has done. what we want to do is look at education through the filter of national security, and basically asked the question, what is the relationship between the challenges about k-12 education and national security of the united states. in turn turn didn't turn out to be a terribly hard thing. she was there. and they cochaired the task force report. the version of this commission. the whole idea of this group in this background, educators and also those who come together in the seam states and say, they raise the question about what is the relationship between the educational challenges we face in the national security challenges. to recap this issue, it is always the fact that it reflects the fact that you are here at the risk of being redundant. but what we wanted to do is get people who are interested in foreign affairs rather than the chronicle of higher educati
on this, she will eventually be forced to relent. she does not have the experience on foreign policy. host: in this wall street journal era, it says the administration may have erred. there are different ways of treating the politics on doing that. you could argue that going in preemptively was a better course in some respects. the idea of a susan rice nomination is still something of a trial balloon, because the president has not said definitively that he wants to make her secretary of state. so this was sort of testing period to see if she could survive. at the same time, no one in the white house has denied that she is his favorite candidate. it could have gone on either way, frankly, yesterday, or at some point after he had already nominated her. host: newspapers are reporting susan rice will be meeting with susan collins of maine and senator bob corker of tennessee, who is in line to be the ranking republican on the senate foreign relations committee, which will hold confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominees. these three republicans would need more republicans to come to t
a long background of dealing in foreign policy issues. but she's also somebody who hasn't been willing to answer some of the hard questions that many of my colleagues have had regarding the situation in benghazi. and i think that demonstrates questions about her judgment and how she would be -- how independent she would be as secretary of state. that's obviously something very important in a secretary of state. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. the president and other folks are hoping for a deal by christmas. is it doable? >> i hope so. i think there's at least in my view an opportunity here for us to do something that's really good for the country. but it has to be -- it's got to be entitlement reform included in anything that we ultimately act on. we believe that in order to solve the country's fiscal solvency issues into the future, you've got to deal with the issue of entitlement reform. that's something so far the president has been reluctant to put on the table. so far what we've gotten out of him is this proposal to raise taxes which we think would be harmful to the economy.
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
which is very important for mexico, for the united states it's not seen as a foreign policy issue. it's seen as a domestic issue. for mexico it's extremely important, the relationship. to the extent there could be any progress on immigration reform in the united states, that would be very much welcome in mexico. >> suarez: as you note, security and drugs are both related and separate at the same time. but just when american voters in a couple of states have decriminalized the use of marijuana we're getting a new mexican president who had signaled during the campaign that he wanted to depart from his predecessor's policy on the war on drugs. as he said how he'll do that? >> he hasn't really spelled it out. we'll learn more once he's inaugurated on saturday and when he begins to pick his cabinet. but we do know that he's going to focus on reducing violence and not give as high a priority on drug enter diction and other kinds of goals that are related to the drug war in particular. i think these votes in colorado and washington state have not gone unnoticed in mexico. i think it's going
'll read an excerpt from foreign policy. with the exception of syria she's won every major battle she's fought at u.n., imposes sanctions on north korea, sending a peacekeeping force, and warding off a full-scale war of sudan and south sudan. you're talking about qualifications for secretary of state, that qualifies her more than reading talking points. >> and at the beginning of this she was one of the few administration officials along with hillary clinton who pushed reluctant people inside the white house, including tom donnell lynn to interview in libya, a position senator republicans took at the time. >> human rights is a key issue and done a lot at u.n. with regard to women, disabled people. and i worked with her in the clinton administration. she was, you know, very tenacious. very intelligent woman. very strong willed. i guess one of the things, as a woman i don't like, some of the criticism of her, if this was a man, it -- these would be positive attributes. >> exactly. >> as a woman, well you know she's feisty. >> or they -- when mccain said she's not very brought, this is s
a radio interview and he expounded on some interesting theories about the president's foreign policy. take a listen. >> the only way you can explain the horrendous decisions that were so completely wrong-headed would be if this administration had a bunch of muslim brotherhood members giving them advice. >> so, bob, it's pretty clear the president has lots of people in the muslim brotherhood working for him like all thots those guys that killed osama bin laden and what about those who command the drone strikes? >> that whack job with texas is the person who went after the woman who works for hillary clinton. this is the kind of conspiracy mongering you would hope was over after this election. instead, it may get worse. and it may take two or three presidential thumpings for the republican party to come to terms with the fact that it can't be anti-immigrant, can't come across as anti-women, and it's never going to get the vote of young voters as long as it's anti-gay. these are hard questions. bill clinton, and matt is right about this, bill clinton brought the democratic party -- it wasn't
will best help him shape and project this country's foreign policy. just as important, the senate has the duty to advise and consent to his decision. if senators see a serious problem with a nominee, they have a right and duty to speak and vote that way. someone keeps telling the press that president obama prefers to nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice, and as long as that person is not the president and does so under ground rules that protect his or her identity, we are condemned to this preventative war we're watching in washington. one side attacking while no one outside the gates of the white house knows what the president intends. i take president obama at his official word. he has not decided whose name to send to the senate, and with that we go to the first of our two senatorial guests, senator bob corker, republican of tennessee. senator corker, i have laid it out as best i can. you senators have a right and a duty to decide, to advise and consent or not to a president's nominee. isn't this strange that we're having the debate about the qualifications for a candidate for the s
was pro-life, although he was pretty hawkish on foreign policy, he focused on jobs. he focused on the economy. and he was disciplined. so people sort of got the message, wink, wink, yeah, i'm pro-life, but i'm not going to change the law. in california he didn't sign a pro-choice position. he wasn't anti-gay. in other words, the emphasis he put on the job creation and the economy is what got him elected. your guy this time, romney, was all over the place getting stuck with positions that the public didn't want. >> but if you watch romney, he basically talked about mostly jobs. i don't recall him being out there with a great big pro-life position. do you? >> well, i thought he was. >> no. >> your platform said 14th amendment rights for the unborn. >> i think in every speech he gave he talked about jobs, jobs, and jobs. i think in the end -- a couple things happened. one, he didn't have an ideology. two, he ran a scorched earth primary campaign which caused people with all the other campaigns not to lift a finger for him. they might have voted for him, but they didn't lift -- >>
the spokesman for the democratic administration's position on foreign policy. and you know, colin powell, god bless him and says this will be the shame of his life, he was the one without made the case for going to war in iraq, you know, as the spokesman. i think this. what struck me was the administration has really handled this badly. i mean you don't send her up to the hill to meet with people unless you're going have some friendly meetings too. are you going to have some positive people come out and say claire mccaskill, they say how wonderful she is and at the same time what you have got to have is other people. where are the endorsers. i haven't heard from madeleine albright, hillary clinton. she just kind of out there by herself which may be a message. >> i will keep watching that one and everything else. >> mark shield, david brooks, thanks as always. and if you want even more, mark and david keep up the talk on the "doubleheader" recorded in our newsroom. that will be posted at the top of the "rundown" later tonight. >> warner: we'll be back shortly with a look at efforts to pinpoint
shows a lot of toughness and lack of respect for the republicans. wish he showed that on foreign policy. >> look, i think what we've learned is that he is a chicago machine politician who happens to have radical values. he is seeking to run the united states the same way the chicago machine would run chicago. i think the challenge for house republicans is, to design a strategy from the base of strength they have, and to be able to say we are not going to go along with this president taking over the whole country in a centralized model where he will have no accountability. they can borrow endless money the geithner proposal, no accountability to anybody. >> sean: mr. speaker appreciate it. great new book. next, bob woodward takes us inside the fiscal cliff negotiating room. he wrote about the grand bargain that didn't happen. congressman louie gohmert is here. you will be surprised what he has to say. it is the story that is now swept the nation a police officer buying a barefoot homeless man a pair of shoes. the woman who captured that video will tell us what the camera didn't. camera d
because of a foreign policy decision. the wars weren't going to be fought. you aren't really saving money. it's a budget gimmick but it's not money you were going to spend. >> no, it's not a budget gimmick. the republicans propose it as a budget gimmick? >> sure, absolutely. >> then you should address it to them. >> but i'm addressing it to you. >> it's a basic challenge we face. this is the challenge we face which is how to bring the deficits down over time. it will require spending, savings and increase in rates and revenues. we think we can do that. we will work hard to do that and we have a good chance do it. no reason we can't do it. >> last question. can you promise we will not go over the cliff? >> no, i can't promise that. that's a decision that lies in the hands of the republicans that are now opposing increases in tax rates. if they recognize reality that we can't afford to extend those tax rates, then we have the basis for an agreement to be very good for the american people. >> and the president bears no responsibility, it's all up to the republicans? >> chris, and yourself th
are no ending the wars for budget purposes but because of the foreign policy decision, the wars were not going to be fought and you are not really saving money, it is a budget gimmick, money -- >> no, it is not, when republicans propose it is a budget gimmick. >> chris: sure, absolutely. >> address it with them. >> chris: well, i'm addressing it with you. >> again, it is a basic challenge we face, chris, the challenge we face, which is how to bring the deficit down over time, now, it will require spending savings, it will require increasing in rates of revenues and we think we can do it and will work hard to do it and have a good chance to do it and no reason we can't. >> chris: last question, can you promise that we will not go over the cliff. >> no, i can't promise that. that is a decision that lies in the hands of the republicans, that are now opposing increases in tax rates, if they recognize the reality, that we cannot afford to extend the tax rates we have the basis for an agreement that would be good for the american people. >> chris: and the president bears no responsibility, it is all
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
foreign policy. what do all three of them have in common in they'll get tea party challenges in 2014. and you know, i read the speeches that rubio and paul ryan gave tonight and they were wonderful about the need to reex out to the poor and the afflicted. and so on. but every republican who votes for any kind of revenue increase in these coming, in these coming votes, there will be facing a tea party challenge. and i suspect that that party is going to have to come to terms with that. it may take a couple more cycles to do it. >>> have the tea party challenge would not even let these guys loose to vote for the american disabilities act going worldwide. >> outrageous. it is just, it is beyond outrageous. it is the kind of crazy nut behavior that lost in this election. mitt romney might have been a more successful candidate if he had stood up to the tea party at any one point during the election. he was never outflanked to his right during the course of winning that nomination. and i think that republicans are going to have to ask themselves. especially those who want to be president.
servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >>
ridiculed hillary clinton's foreign policy experience and called john mccain reckless and confused. if the president does nominate her, those who know susan rice well say she's more than up for the fight, and although it would be a bruising confirmation battle, she almost certainly would have the votes to be confirmed. jonathan karl, abc news, washington. >>> interesting parallel that story points out between condoleezza, confirmation process, and this one. "the washington post," interesting profile, i like the human nuggets they find. as u.n. ambassador she gained a reputation for sharp intellect. and sharp elbows. she is not known for diplomatic finesse, known for being aggressive sometimes too aggressive and using salty language on occasion. in private she has a good sense of humor. trying to dig up some humanity on her as well, but clearly she's a bulldog behind closed doors. >> they wouldn't indicate whether or not they would block the nomination if it gets to the point. the president has not nominated her to this point, we just want to make that clear. but some of the beef th
's foreign policy and seldom the case a achievement or error by one of them endures forever. analysts say secretary clinton brought undeniable star power to her role as chief diplomat and used her unique status on the world stage and global rolodex to advance issues of concern to her. she is included gender equality, the environment, technology and social media and steering of resources to her department. yet on the great foreign policy challenge of her time clinton can point to only limited progress of kind could be expected in the post 9/11 world where tough sanctions on iran's oil and gas sector failed to check that regime's march towards nuclear weapon. where change in leadership in north korea produced know change in that rogue state's behavior and upheaval's of the arab spring hardly dampened the volatility of the middle east. one analyst who worked for six secretaries of state told fox news, hillary clinton will not enter the secretary of states hall of fame, he argues, her boss kept mrs. clinton on a short leash. >> issues regarding peace, war, iraq being afghanistan, war against
, the administration chose that particular foreign policy leader to go on sunday shows as opposed to other folks in the administration. my hunch is -- this is really just my guess. it isn't something i've coordinated. >> no talking points with the intelligence? >> no talking points. my view of it is that this was obviously a terrible incident where americans were killed. and there was clear sort of lack of full coordination and communication between elements of the executive branch. and they made a choice to have her be the sort of face forward for the administration on responding to questions about what had happened and why and when and where. i would be joining calls for an investigation and a joint committee and so forth if the administration were stonewalling and saying we won't be accountable for this. we won't tell you what happened. we won't get into the background. that's not been my experience. the senate foreign relations committee on which i serve unanimously sent a letter to the administration asking that we be briefe
, a centrist on foreign policy has expressed support for some of the obama administrations recent national security policy. again, that's from the hill reporting on foreign policy magazine's article yesterday. now, this is from the washington times this morning. hill panels play musical chairs, this is about the new chairs of the house committees in the house of representatives, and from yesterday's newspaper, the hill, gmple o.p. women press boehner for top committee spots. this is molly hooper's article. molly hooper reports on the leadership in congress for the hill newspaper. molly, who are some of the new chairs? caller: well, the new chairs happen to mostly be men. in fact, they're all men, with the exception of two open spots that have yet to be assigned by speaker boehner. but we're basically going to see a lot of the old faces. there's seven committees have new chairman this year, or will in the next congress. you'll be seeing a conservative republican from texas, atop financial services. ed royce, california republican of foreign affairs. representative mike mccall, texas republi
the fight with john tower in the first term. not a great way to start it. foreign policy is usually the time presidents get tripped up. it happened with truman and rgan and bush in iraq. foreign policy surprises can derail a second term. the president will have to be careful of benghazi. >> gretchen: you would think if they were concerned about legacy they would do things they know they can control. nick, thank you for your thoughts. >> thank you. >> gretchen: she should have died, the cheerleader who fell 40 feet from a window . he used the gun to save his boss. how was he rewarded? he was fired. happy birthday to johnnie resneck of the goo-goo dolls. he's 47. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> now that the election is over i am getting the impression that president obama is getting a little cocky. >> working to get public support for the tax and spending proposal. president obama answered questions on twitter. how will you stop us from going over the fiscal cliff and will it involve significant deficit reduction. the president said i thought twitter was supposed to be fun. where are all of the crazy video. tw
for international peace. we believe that our global economic interests and our foreign policy values are closely tied together. they should be closely tied together. and that's why we urge our colleagues to seize this opportunity that russia's succession to the world trade organization presents for both job creation and our ability to bind russia to a rule-based system of trade and dispute resolution. granting russia permanent normal trade relations is as much in our interest as it is in theirs. frankly, that's what ought to guide the choices that we make in the senate. the up side of this policy is clear on an international landscape. it is one that really offers this kind of what i would call, frankly, a kind of one-sided trade deal, one that promises billions of dollars in new u.s. exports and thousands of new jobs in america that is certainly in our interest. russia is today the world's seventh-largest economy. having officially joined the w.t.o. on august 22, russia is now required by its membership in the w.t.o. to lower tariffs and to open up to new imports. that sudden jump in market acc
of the treasury, he was deputy secretary during president bush and happened to be a senior foreign policy ambassador to germany and is one of the very few people who synthesizes the economic and national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat who was one of the reasons i moved to washington, really great to have bob here. to michael porter's right ahead douglas holtz-eakin iran the congressional budget office and is a distinguished economist. he was john mccain's economic adviser in the first campaign. he is now running the american action forum. he is one of the best hot shots on fiscal issues but does it kindly and then we have steve case. i wanted to give him chairmanship of the jobs council, jeff immelt had that but not for long. steve case, one of the founders and chairman of aol, he chairs the entrepreneurship council, chairman of revolution, very tied up in trying to think about what are the spark the drive innovation, creativity, how do you drive young people here. you have been involved in a major study, u.s. competitive project at harvard business school.
these policy issues. in your role now, what do you think is the most critical issue in foreign policy at this point? >> well, there are a series of them. i do think that one has to deal with the issue of continuing terrorism in certain places and as we've already raised, the nuclear proliferation issue. i also -- my personal belief is that the gap between the rich and the poor is something that is a national security issue and needs to be looked at. and what i'm doing here in turkey is being present atten infrastructure conference which does talk about the importance of providing infrastructure in developing countries because it's really a way to pursue giving the people what they need. i believe democracy has to deliver and infrastructure is one of the deliverables that really proves that we can help each over and eliminates what is a basic injustice as this gap between the rich and the poor. >> internal difficulties to overcome, as well. madeleine albright former u.s. secretary of state. thank you again for your time this morning. >>> now if you're just joining us, a reminder these
.s. troops on the ground. they wanted minimal arms to defend themselves and we outsourced our foreign policy to fundamentalist regimes and they supported the fundamentalists. there is one other issue. the nato air defense patriot batteries going to turkey to defend turkish air space and send a message to assad. that an inside baseball nato issue. and i wouldn't confuse that with giving arms to the syrian rebels. megyn: is there any way of establishing a safe haven any want the viewers to know syria seems so far away it seems like there is a bad guy running it and folks trying to exploit the situation. but the reports are some of these assad forces were going door to door, lining up entire families, shooting little kids in the head in front of their parent and shooting the parent in front of the children. lining them up one by one and watching them kill the families right in front of them. it's so gruesome and vial. is there anything we can do in terms of establishing a safe haven or something for people to get to? >> certainly there are de facto safe havens across the turkish and jordanian f
that so unsecured when the british left and everyone else. if we don't change our strategy from a foreign policy, change this lightfoot print approach to the war on terror there will be more benghazis. martha: what about that morning. i'm joined by kt macfarland. kt, it's so interesting. you watch these shows and you hear benghazi brought up. so often the reacross is get over it. move on. move on. why should we not move on? >> because that wham we did in 1998 when there were twin bombings in u.s. embassies in east africa and in 2000 when there was an attack against the u.s.s. cole in the region. what are we doing now? fast forward a decade. we have had attacks on american soil at consulate and americans had died. what are we doing? we are arguing with ourselves. we know where those died training camps are in eastern libya. why not go after them. what is the lesson al qaeda takes from this? once again no consequences. the americans will be fighting each other, not us. i think we allow them to become emboldened, and this is a green light for continuing to attack americans. martha: what do y
at the foreign policies. where are we in economic transition. absolutely nowhere. so i think the japanese have learned after three years of lost time that they do need to move things forward. okay ldp not being the best, we all know that however, in saying that, they at least know how to implement the policies. >> what's the policy of any significant change of monetary after the election compared to what tell like to see happen? >> there will be much stronger imposed. ldp is already verbally putting this on. it's almost a race who can put more pressure to bank of japan in the sense that they can alleviate the market. of course from a westerner's point of view, i'm sure in a dangerous move that they were asserting far too much pressure to central banks. but that's exactly almost like a tool that's been used for many of the parties involved to get elected right now in japan. >> all right. thank you. good to see you. on the asian agenda tomorrow, third quarter growth figures. india, a check on the country's services industry. and on the political front, as well, parliament gets ready to vote on a
's hard to fault the president on foreign policy. we did what he ran on. >> caller: right. and the thing with iraq -- the strategy we had in iraq was basically -- people got mad because he didn't leave immediately and people got mad because he didn't stay there long enough. the strategy followed the doctrine of counter insurgency which is you stabilize the government -- you can't just leave. you have to build up a government, police and everything like that and once it is stable then the forces leave and dod contracts come in to advise. >> stephanie: all right. i got to run. but thank you for your service, and thank you for your call. >> caller: thank you. >> stephanie: right? >> right. >> stephanie: smartest boy in class already. >> we need more flint locks. >> stephanie: we don't have enough boats. >> we have no cavalry anymore at all. good heavens. >> it is entirely unacceptable to have a repeat performance of what the american people watched with horror in the summer of 2011. >> stephanie: it's true. it's like bad food repeating on you. when i read this i was li
that he has on foreign policy in the republican senate caucus? mika and i talked to so many people over the past two, three years that say we want, republican senators, we want out of afghanistan but, you know what, we just sort of stay out of john's way. how many times have we heard that? >> a lot. it's disturbing. >> we hear it all the time. they stay out of his way. are they going to blindly follow and, again, i love and respect senator mccain, but i don't want my party to blindly follow him over a cliff on this battle especially if it's a personal one. >> well, on this battle it may be a personal one. i think the answer to your broader question is that republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the museum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more engagement, more involvement. so there are a lot of big issues that he has huge influence on because of his experiences, his personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on. two of the three s
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
impact of all it, we have the vice president of foreign and defense policy studies wiih the american entprise institute. welcome back to the show. thank you for joining us. thank you. melissa: let me get your reaction what is going on totoday. first in egypt. reports he left the palace. is that meaningful to you you know, i think it is probably jt discretion on his part. they're firing. there is a lot of violee there. people are climbing over the fences. suspect rather than fleeing the palace as it has been made to sound in certain headlines he is just actually getting out of the way of tisonfrontation. melissa: it soundsretty serious. one of the points you make from one perspeiveshows democracy is in action. before the protests began a lot of peoplemade prediction we would see many protesrs out there in support of morsi. to them and what else to go out and protest. seems like there are a lot more angry protesters out there than ose in favor of presiden morsi. looks like he is losing at least some control. what happens, who is next in line if something happens? >> wl, i don't think t
this by you. i mean, isn't it part rice's personality the editor at large of foreign policy magazine describes rice this way, quote, she's not easy. i'm not sure i'd want to take her on a picnic with my family, but if the president wants her to be secretary of state, she'll work hard. this is from a reuters article. so is it in part that senators aren't used to dealing with a person -- i mean, susan rice just comes out and kind of says things. she's blunt. she's not charming, warm, etcetera. >> or maybe some might say diplomatic which you need for the role of secretary of state. you know, that might be part of it because, look, this is a club up here, a member of the club is somebody who wants that job. we're talking about senator john kerry who is the senate foreign relations chairman that might be sort of an under current here. i think the big issue when it comes to susan rice isn't so much her personality. it's that republican senators think that she is just too political. bob corker, who is meeting with her later this morning as well, he is a republican from tennessee, he said that she wou
. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today who has played such a fundamental role over the last several years. been part of literally every negotiation that has taken place. he still an optimist, so i think that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in
things. they don't believe in the same way to prosperity. they don't believe in the same way in foreign policy. they can agree that they love america. we do know, in fact, that there has been some democratic interest in one governor romney's ideas, which was to put a cap on deductions. just say, okay, you can only take, you know, this much of your income, that kind of thing. can i see that there might be a discussion about that, but the specifics are not going to be dealt with between mitt romney and president obama. that ship sailed. this has to do with the president and basically the republicans on the house side, so i see this more as a photo op. i guess we're fwog get a still picture and a read-out about their nice, cordal meeting. i'm not saying nothing could happen. i just think it's hard to figure what it would be. there's ain't lot of love between them here. they have to make nice. how do they begin, do you think, to work in the same direction, to kind of put that aside? how much of this relationship really needs repairing? >> i don't know that either one of them feel it needs r
. what can our current president of the united states learn from churchhill's foreign policy? >> one thing churchhill would not believe in leading from behind. he believed in telling the facts and then rallying the people around the facts. >> steve: yeah. >> and what he can learn in this book, not only his many prophecies was proved to be true. but that the way he arrived at these predictions. that process is a premer for presidential leadership. >> steve: you think that it a big mistake for president obama in his first term to return that famous bust of churchhill to the british and took it out of the white house. >> well he did it, yes. when it went there the night before. yes, he was awful rejecting the wisdom of churchhill he could listen to churchhill he would say the important thing is not to be popular, but to be respected. and churchhill did that. he told the people the truth. that's the reason he was a great prophet not only did he know history but he had the courage to deliver the unvarnished facts unlike spineless politician or burrcrats. >> steve: maybe the president coul
. but as it relates to foreign policy, what would you say is our greatest challenge to move forward that no one is talking about? >> well, so what did the two most important people in this country sit down and talk about yesterday at lunch? when everything else is done and the election is wrapped up, it isn't about social issues. it isn't about the fringe issues. they sat down together and talked about america's leadership in the world. so at the end of the day, that's what matters most to republicans and to democrats. how do you get to where we need to be? it's going to be about economics. it's going to be about education. it's going to be about rounding out tax policies that serve our free market economy. and we're not there yet. but it was interesting when i read, you know, the news coming out of yesterday's lunch. at the end of the day, what is it we care most about? republicans, democrats, sit down and break bread. >> two things. first, ambassador, this idea that the corporations control our government destroys our democracy. and that's something i think republicans have to -- the progress
's work on the defense authorization bill. >> frank oliveri is the defense and foreign-policy writer for congressional quarterly. the senate has been in a holding pattern the defense authorization bill and they finally found a way to start the duration of amendments. what broke the logjam? >> will, randy paul had desire to bring amendments that would've applied sixth amendment rights to u.s. citizens taken in the war on terror on u.s. homeland and as a result he was concerned he wouldn't get the time. senator mccain on the senate armed services committee showed in he would not try to block grandpas amended. dianne feinstein had an amendment that senator paul favors they would please some restrictions on the types of of reason you can't arrest americans to send to hold them adeptly and so on and so forth. that event is approved. >> can you point this out until as the outcome? >> dear friend sanctions amendment would limit types of materials related to shipping another thing survey and this is a pretty tough amendment, but not as tough with what the house would prefer to do. that in fa
do anything other than a spectacular job. but i'm a political guy, not a foreign policy guy. i'm just unable to really render a very knowledgeable -- >> let me rephrase the question. politically speaking, who would the president be better off nominating? >> politically speaking? probably ambassador rice because she would represent sort of new and different administration. but i don't think people when they look at the secretary of state, i don't think that there's much of a political gain there. i say that, but i say it without a lot of conviction or a lot of authority. i think the one that you want is the one that does the best job because if they get in there and do something wrong, the politics of it are horrendous for you. i'm just not that -- that's not my area of expertise. >> mary, what's your thought? >> he cannot nominate susan rice and not because of the benghazi scandal but because of her previous tenure at state where she doesn't have a good record and her u.n. record is not good. we don't have time to go through the particulars, but i think senator kerry would not only be
around by reving red pe. theiderelatinghe retail sector trying to attract foreign retailers to open stores. media have dubbed the policy the big bang reform. people who own shops are less enthusiastic. >> reporter: massive rallies took place across india in september to protest against the planned reforms. many small shop owners are worried that deregulation threatens their businesses. about 40 million people work in india's rebuilt industries. for decades the sector was considered a sacred cow, except -- exempt from deregulation. most businesses are small and independent. they see a growing sense of crisis that they won't be able to compete with large foreign chains. the government hopes new investment will lead to improvement in india's old fashion distribution system. some indian businesses use trucks to transport goods. others still rely on horse drawn cars. poor roads mean perishable items go bad enroute. and the country doesn't have enough warehouses to stop food tting before it gets to the store. the cost of spoiled produce adds to the prices for consumers. to improve the sit
. like, you can't do it all. we had an atlantic cover story weaselly that wasn't about foreign policy. the title was why women still can't have it all. but it does -- can america still have it all? and in the way, has framed that, the answer is no, that there are limits. >> steve, even as we rebalanced to the asia-pacific we have continued are deep engagement with the region, other countries just as if, there's one example in our defense strategic guidance put out in january talked about having to become a net provider of security. i think you see that over the last couple of decades, and you see ongoing today. we will continue to be engaged in a obvious of the middle east and north africa and globally. the united states is a global power. it is not a zero-sum game, particularly when you look at the importance of alliances and partnerships, both within the asia-pacific and globally. our objective is to continue to strengthen those alliances and partnerships, and if we, if i can pivot to the topic of china, to build on the areas of cooperation that we have across the border, including
their digital director. dan who was their foreign policy advisor, beth meyers. >> bill: you have all of the major players there. what did you learn from the romney campaign? >> just so many nuggets came out of it. when we talked about what happened with clint eastwood, stuart says personally, die think it was a big deal. he goes up to clint eastwood beforehand saying you're going to be talking about the same little speech you gave at two fund-raisers, aren't you? and eastwood -- he looked at him and just said yep and then he goes out and does the empty chair thing. but while that dominated the news of the night and it was part of the their at this of that convention, they didn't think it was determinative. >> bill: they're still in denial. >> the other thing that was interesting is on the selection of paul ryan. so the democrats this we kind of knew. actually, i know from another forum that david axelrod was at the university of chicago institute of politics. he talked about how he thought all along it would be eit
of its name will have a tough time getting to third. >> emily cadei is a foreign-policy writer for cq, congressional quarterly. you can read her work at rollcall.com and follow her on twitter@emily cadei. thanks. >> guest: absolutely. >> for the first time, bradley melling's attorney spoke out publicly on his client. manning is accused of leaking classified documents on wikileaks. manny's pretrial hearing is underway. this is a half-hour. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. well, i really appreciate the turnout here and especially the turnout by the press. thank you for that. [applause] as many of you know, i have not participated any public events before today. i also avoid any interviews with the media. it was and still is my belief that bradley manning deserves an attorney that is focused on what is happening in the courtroom and only what is happening in the courtroom. that is why i have chosen not to do the interviews. but today however marks a milestone and is actually supposed to be really to the motions hearing that we were going through and it would mark the end of
life-saving assistance, whether they support children, strengthen food security or advance u.s. foreign policy. we also consider operational issues including efficient management and oversight. this case by case analysis ensures that there is careful consideration of the context surrounding a proposed activity. before the coup, usaid was the largest donor supporting leches in mali. programs trained poll workers and improved elections monitoring systems, strengthened political parties and provided voter education. when the electoral support activities resumed, providing the consent of congress, it will help support free an fair elections in mali and a peaceful political exit from the current situation. a key issue will be ensuring the inclusion and participation of the internally displaced personals and refugees in the political process. we plan to expand our elections assistance programming to include broader civic engagement activities, to support national reconciliation as part of the return to an inclusive democratic maliian society. the only usaid supported economic growth activitie
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the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that there should not be spending as part as this debate. there has been over $1 trillion in spending cuts. that is a part of this debate that gets lost. just because washington has a short memory does not mean we should all have one and that there has already been sacrifice on behalf of the american people through those domestic discretionary cuts. we are excited. c.a.p. has been a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we have talked about medicare savings that can improve and strengthen the program and address rising national health expenditures. we will have more to say on the issue of taxes. we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today, who has played a fundamental role over the last several years. he has been part of every negotiation that has taken place. he is still an optimist. that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in the budget negotiations. he was
or gun control or foreign policy. not everybody is a single issue voter. >> no. not everybody is and, you know, give him the benefit of the doubt. let's give him the benefit of the doubt. take a step back. the issue is whether it's warren buffet worth 50 million pointing down at us and saying, hum. maybe the threshold should be 500,000 instead of 250,000. i don't know about you. but when i see the automatic pilot, and thank god it is for the business community to have accountants, mr. buffet doesn't do his own taxes. i doubt mr. senegal does. they all know this and they operate in a world where they preach to us what they believe is a middle class friendly gospel. but they don't really believe it. >> rick, this argument presumes that mr. senegal voted for the special dividend this year based on his own pocketbook. there are still millions of shareholders -- >> i'm not saying that at all. i'm saying that if you really believe, listen, if it was me, if it was me, i would take that money and donate it and i would call the president to urge him to make it retroactive because obviously they're
and rockets that smuggle to hamas. in the second term, no foreign policy challenge is more critical. the president has been dealing with iran's suspected nuclear threats. >> andrea mitchell in washington. thanks so much. >>> egypt islamists approved a draft constitution this morning that could further enrage anti-government protesters. it was passed without participation of liberal and christian members. human rights experts fear it could give muslim clerics influence over legislation and restrict freedom of speech and women's rights. >>> a spokesman says former president george h.w. bush should be able to leave the hospital by the weekend. he has been hospitalized for complications from bronchitis. >>> last day of trading for november. what's moving the markets? good morning, kayla. >> the stocks are following the fiscal cliff and the market dove yesterday on comments from house speaker john boehner. data released yesterday showed economic growth in the u.s. is still weak. consumers and businesses alike are putting a hold on spending. natalie? >> thank you. >>> and a grade school i
add together administration's problem is a the president tries to assemble a foreign policy team for his second term. savannah. >> andrea mitchell in washington, thank you. >>> let's turn to chris matthews, host of msnbc's "hardball," chris, good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. >> as andrea pointed all indications are that susan rice will be the pick for secretary of state and all indications are that it would be a very ugly confirmation battle. is it worth it for the president to take on this fight, and at this point, does he have any choice given how vigorously he's defended her? >> officially the white house has not made a decision yet. i was told last night right at the top over there they haven't made a decision yet, but he clearly has to get some separation it seems from the fight over what happened in benghazi, the testimony she gave on "meet the press" in mid-september was and the issue of picking secretary of state. if he can separate the two issues by a couple of weeks. if he has to make the nomination right in the middle of this, we'll have an opening act to
. this is either a counterfeit product or a product that was made in a foreign country and intended only for foreign distribution. >> reporter: turns out, she said, it was the latter. foreign made not meant for sale in the united states. she called amazon citing their a-z protection policy and got nowhere. >> i hadn't reportd the problem to the seller within 14 days. i was not covered by the a-z guarantee. >> remember, the product broke the 31st day she had it. so show called worldwide distributors again and she said this time they admitted the product was, in fact, made for foreign sale. and agreed to give her a full refund once she returned the ds. she put it in the mail and posted negative feedback on the seller. that is when she got a phone call from worldwide distributors. >> the seller told me that because i had returned the product after 30 days, they would normally charge me to deduct the stocking fee. if i removed my negative feedback, they would not dedip of the. >> wanting her full refund, she wanted her feedback -- removed her feedback. >> i was lined up to do my shopping on
received by the foreign relations committee. joining the convention will not require any change. i emphasize that again it doesn't require any change. in the existing united states law of policies regarding treatment of the disabled. and the statements before the foreign relations committee, the united states would assume in joining the convention. in order to } the importance of this point, the foreign relations committee specifically address it -- in the instrument of ratification, the current united states law for bills the obligations of the convention of the united states of america. on a related point, we also underscored that the convention will not be self-executing in the united states law. this means that the provisions are not directly enforceable in united states courts. and we do not confer private rights of action enforceable in the united states. these provisions of advice and consent establish important parameters. they give effect to the intent of the senate and they join in the convention that will not require any changes the united states laws and policies, with
-service tonight here on c-span. next, the israeli foreign minister talks about the impediments to peace in the region. speaking from the saban center for middle east policy, this is about an hour. >> we meet at a time of great turmoil and the middle east. just after the presidential election and the united states. two weeks ago, we were looking at the prospect of canceling the forum because of the war that was going on with hamas and gaza. thankfully, calm has been restored. hopefully it is a lasting calm. every day brings dramatic news from the middle east. yesterday, the plo won recognition as a non-member observer state. egyptians were in the street demonstrating against their newly elected muslim brotherhood president's latest decrees. this evening, the governor of israel announced 3000 new settlements. how is the united states and israel to cope with all of these dramatic developments? how is the united states and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle e
in driving our nation's economy. unfortunately, current immigration policies are preventing american businesses from hiring foreign students who earn advanced degrees in approximate science, technology, engineering and mathematics from our best universities. from growing startups to u.s. multinationals, american employers are desperate for qualified stem workers no matter where they're from. microsoft, for example, has over 6,000 job openings waiting to be filled by scientists, researchers, engineers and developers. for now these openings and many others will remain vacant because too few american students are graduating with stem degrees and foreign stem graduates can't get the visas they need. every year the u.s. invests in educating thousands of foreign students in stem fields at our top universities only to send them back to compete against us. chairman lamar smith, along with congressman raul labrador, congressman bob goodlatte, and of course, the gentleman from california, mr. issa, have all worked on this and we have now put forward the measure before us to spur job creation b
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